PL EN


2006 | 37 | 1 | 16-22
Article title

Perceptual fluency, preference, and evolution

Authors
Title variants
Languages of publication
EN
Abstracts
EN
Preference for symmetry in ornaments or faces in different species may have evolved because symmetry indicated mate quality, leading to advantages in natural selection. Alternatively, symmetry preference may reflect sensory biases that evolved because of the need for signal recognition. If so, selection for signal recognition may have led to preferences for any perceptual features which are easy to perceive, such as symmetry, figure-ground contrast, and surface continuity. Consequently, the general underlying mechanism would be perceptual fluency, i.e. the phenomenal experience of ease of perception. Consistent with this assumption, human participants preferred vertical symmetry to asymmetry, continuous to discontinuous surfaces, and high over low figure-ground contrast in pairs of random shapes without any biological significance. Moreover, the preferred features were objectively and subjectively easier to perceive.
Keywords
Contributors
author
  • R. Reber, University of Bergen, Department of Psychosocial Science, Christiesgate 12, N-5015 Bergen, Norway
References
Document Type
Publication order reference
Identifiers
CEJSH db identifier
06PLAAAA01773829
YADDA identifier
bwmeta1.element.03bd7d16-17ce-3e4f-89b3-0f1d65498338
JavaScript is turned off in your web browser. Turn it on to take full advantage of this site, then refresh the page.