PL EN


2010 | 19 | 1 | 134-167
Article title

RETHINKING THE EXPANSION OF ISLAM IN EASTERN AND SOUTHERN AFRICA

Title variants
Languages of publication
EN
Abstracts
EN
The process of the up-country Islamic expansion, away from the Islamised towns situated on the long East African coast, began only in the nineteenth-century. Islam advanced slowly and gradually along a network of caravan routes through trading contacts with some African peoples, spread by ordinary adherents, Kiswahili-speaking merchants, who penetrated the interior of Eastern Africa in search for ivory and slaves. Economic and trading interests and activities played also a role in the spread of Islam at the southernmost tip of the African continent. Many slaves and political prisoners sent to the Cape during the period 1652 to 1795 were Muslims. Even though the idea of a comparison between Eastern and Southern Africa may arouse contradictory reactions among the Islam ś students, an attempt will be made at an appraisal of similarities and differences in the expansion of Islam, Islam's contribution to literacy, education and intellectual development.
Discipline
Year
Volume
19
Issue
1
Pages
134-167
Physical description
Document type
ARTICLE
Contributors
  • Viera Pawlikova-Vilhanova, Ustav orientalistiky SAV, Klemensova 19, 813 64 Bratislava, Slovak Republic
References
Document Type
Publication order reference
Identifiers
CEJSH db identifier
11SKAAAA09337
YADDA identifier
bwmeta1.element.0738f20d-eb46-36f0-910d-33261a257b28
JavaScript is turned off in your web browser. Turn it on to take full advantage of this site, then refresh the page.