PL EN


2007 | 2(17) | 367-386
Article title

Silence of a Feminine 'jouissance'

Authors
Title variants
Languages of publication
PL
Abstracts
EN
Nobody actually knows what was the melody the Sirens sang to Odysseus. Some even claim that they remained silent. Some identify they singing with poetry in general, and their song with the Odyssey itself. For psychoanalysis, the Sirens, as they are both terrifying and irresistible, serve as a fruitful metaphor for femininity. Their song which is impossible to describe stands for unspeakable bliss of female orgasm. The authoress focuses on the personage of Odysseus as having exceptional courage to 'know the real' - yet she questions his success in this knowledge. She points out that, from the psychoanalytical point of view, his encounter with Sirens concerns the logic of desire and drive. The Sirens express their desire openly and therefore incite horror and anxiety. Possible interpretations of how Odysseus deals with his anxiety recall strategies the hysterics and the obsessive undertake in front of a wanting Other.
Contributors
author
  • R. Salecl, Uniiversity of Liublana, Faculty of Law, Liublana, Slovenia
References
Document Type
Publication order reference
Identifiers
CEJSH db identifier
07PLAAAA02605369
YADDA identifier
bwmeta1.element.0f9207f5-19ba-3b84-ba24-376871afa1c2
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