PL EN


2005 | 12 | 4 | 361-376
Article title

ACQUAINTANCE AND NAMING: A RUSSELIAN THEME IN EPISTEMOLOGY

Authors
Title variants
Languages of publication
EN
Abstracts
EN
Russell's distinction between knowledge by acquaintance and knowledge by description has been recently re-examined in frequently controversial epistemological contributions. The present essay reflects upon the pertinent papers by D. F. Pears, J. Hintikka, R. Chisholm, W. Sellars, A. J. Ayer, and others, but is primarily founded on Russell's significant formulations from his writings published between 1910 and 1918. By employing an auxiliary device of a late-Wittgensteinian language game, I explore at first the situation in which human subject is 'experiencing' and naming particular objects (Russell's sensedata and sensibilia) and later the subject's acquaintance with universals. The reconstruction of such situations shows that, contrary to Russell's assumptions, even the 'purest' acquaintance cannot function without knowledge by description, i.e. without stating propositions about the object of acquaintance (whatever its nature). Then the only 'descriptionless' alternative would be a kind of intuitive knowledge of such objects which is difficult to reconcile with the position held by Russell in the 1910s. Whatever the consequences, this topic retains its fundamental epistemological significance.
Contributors
  • A. Riska, no address given, contact the journal editor
References
Document Type
Publication order reference
Identifiers
CEJSH db identifier
06SKAAAA00882111
YADDA identifier
bwmeta1.element.19a4e3ab-453c-3a77-8b60-100500ee8bd6
JavaScript is turned off in your web browser. Turn it on to take full advantage of this site, then refresh the page.