PL EN


2010 | 20 | 3 | 172-184
Article title

Hry a hračky romských dětí

Authors
Content
Title variants
EN
GAMES AND TOYS OF ROMA CHILDREN
Languages of publication
CS
Abstracts
EN
The contribution deals with the research of children's folklore among Romani people. The author proceeds from her own experience, terrain research, written retrospective sources and literature. She was collecting the source materials for the study between 2005 and 2010, in different types of residential areas. Each of them presents specific features in gaming expressions, in knowledge and variability of games as well as in relationship to toys. Children in Roma settlements use toys collectively. Their games have simple rules, they do not last very long and depend on the actual situation, weather, and the possibility to use the surrounding space and the material offered. The nature in their closest neighborhood provides them with wide variability and possibilities. In Roma settlements, one can note modern varieties of traditional children's games even today. Children coming from non-segregated environment of a small town are better interrelated with their toys; they understand 'playing' in the sense coming near to its usual interpretation. Children from urban agglomeration are lacking mostly in the space itself. Their nearer contact with every-day reality and majority inhabitants in the neighborhood are reflected in diversity of games (cards, cara), used toys (toys for sandpit) and e.g. even in using the children's counting-our rhymes implied from Czech cultural environment.
Year
Volume
20
Issue
3
Pages
172-184
Physical description
Document type
ARTICLE
Contributors
author
  • Jana Polakova, Muzeum romske kultury, Bratislavska 67, 602 00 Brno, Czech Republic
References
Document Type
Publication order reference
Identifiers
CEJSH db identifier
11CZAAAA094936
YADDA identifier
bwmeta1.element.273592b5-8f4e-317a-bad4-515336c4b621
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