PL EN


2010 | 58 | 4 | 527-548
Article title

Otroctví a jeho podoby v Platónově filosofii

Content
Title variants
EN
Slavery and the form it takes in Plato’s philosophy
Languages of publication
CS
Abstracts
EN
The author in this study attempts to capture the meaning of the institution of slavery in Plato’s work. By an analysis of individual passages that are of relevance in Plato’s work, especially from the Republic and the Laws, he reaches the conclusion that Plato employs multiple metaphors of slavery and that they are of fundamental importance for his political philosophy. Plato accepts the common of view of his time on the psychology of slaves, treating slavery as the worst quality of the soul. Inspite of this, in his descriptions of the best system he preserves slaves as a integral part of the community. In the Laws he summarises his reflections on the political order in key maxims: it is good to be a slave to that which is better than us and of greater reason. Plato thus also gives slavery positive connotations as a symbol of subordination in his view justified to the hegemony of the lovers of wisdom. In keeping with this (to us) alarming judgement, he proposes the employment of traditional Greek religion to reinforce the hegemony of the philosophical elite over the rest of society.
Keywords
EN
slavery   Plato  
Year
Volume
58
Issue
4
Pages
527-548
Physical description
Document type
ARTICLE
Contributors
  • Filosofický časopis, redakce, Filosofický ústav AV ČR, v.v.i., Jilská 1, 110 00 Praha 1, Czech Republic
References
Document Type
Publication order reference
Identifiers
YADDA identifier
bwmeta1.element.27b37629-d7ff-470e-a10d-22a4ec3eedb0
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