PL EN


2007 | 4 | 165-197
Article title

THE UNITED STATES AND THE JEWISH QUESTION IN POLAND IN THE YEARS 1926-1935

Authors
Title variants
Languages of publication
PL
Abstracts
EN
During the interwar period the attitude of the Americans and their state towards the Jewish Diaspora was less significant for the perception of international relations in general and trans-Atlantic ones in particular than after World war II. Nonetheless, it already disclosed a certain way of seeing Polish reality from the viewpoint of the Jewish minority. From the time of the May 1926 coup d'etat to the death of Marshal Pilsudski, pertinent assessments were much more favourable than was the case both earlier and later. This approach was affected by the conditions prevailing in Poland and comparisons with the situation of the Jews in other countries. In the former instance, the heart of the matter concerned the post-May 1926 relegation from power of the anti-Jewish rightist and centrist parties. Moreover, the range of the opinions was influenced by the restrictive national policy applied towards other ethnic minorities, especially after 1935. Taking into consideration the scale of references defined by Jewish experiences in other parts of the world - persecutions in Palestine during the late 1920s, or the circumstances in Germany after Hitler seized power in 1933, the situation of the Polish Jews appeared to be favourable. This was also the way in which it was considered by the American authorities and the Jewish organisations active in the USA.
Contributors
author
  • P. Rozanski, Uniwersytet Gdanski, Instytut Historii, ul. W. Stwosza 55, 80-952 Gdansk, Poland
References
Document Type
Publication order reference
Identifiers
CEJSH db identifier
08PLAAAA05249947
YADDA identifier
bwmeta1.element.44555779-f90f-38c2-91b2-dc0619873623
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