PL EN


2009 | 1(165) | 27-38
Article title

THE LIFE COURSE OF COLLECTIVE MEMORIES: PERSISTENCY AND CHANGE IN WEST GERMANY BETWEEN 1950 AND 1970

Title variants
Languages of publication
EN
Abstracts
EN
This paper uses (West) Germany as an exemplary case to analyse the formation of collective memories over a period of more than two decades after 1945. It traces the formation of collective memories in the German public through a decade of collective amnesia, followed by a period of regaining collective memories. It argues that the formation of collective memories is embedded in social and normative change, and identifies three causal factors that were responsible for the oscillation between amnesia and memory: the absence of victims in the imminent post-war period, that promoted the 'myth of innocence' (Fulbrook 1999); a series of major trials that started in the 1960s; and young elites who acknowledged moral and legal guilt and supported the trials, reconciliation and compensation. Data from public opinion polls covering the period from 1950-1970 are presented.
Keywords
Contributors
  • Susanne Karstedt, School of Sociology and Criminology, Keele University, Keele Staffordshire, United Kingdom
References
Document Type
Publication order reference
Identifiers
CEJSH db identifier
09PLAAAA068413
YADDA identifier
bwmeta1.element.4f6252af-b33e-38d6-b1ec-fafcd5c59410
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