PL EN


2009 | 1-2 | 277-289
Article title

CHARLES MARLOW THE COLONISER, OR, THE IRONIC NECESSITY (Kolonizator Charles Marlow, czyli 'ironiczna koniecznosc')

Authors
Title variants
Languages of publication
PL
Abstracts
EN
This article is a polemic with a postcolonial interpretation of Joseph Conrad's 'Heart of Darkness' - namely, with the images of black dwellers of Africa as criticised by Nigerian author Chinua Achebe. As is made apparent through a careful analysis of the text, while not denying the sense of strangeness against 'the savage', Marlow makes an effort to understand their otherness as well as, and primarily so, his own response to how the Other behaves. The theme of a sarcastic story is therefore not aborigines but rather, the white invaders of Congo territory and their attitude to the local black people. Marlow's fascination with Kurtz, 'the most outstanding amongst the daemons of this country', has led the captain to conceal his cruelties committed against colonial protectors and his fiancée. Marlow is tormented by these lies, his story, being told to fellow-travellers in another trip, is a sort of catharsis to him. Marlow, a noble man, positions himself as a coloniser whilst his irony turns into a self-irony. This obviously does not mean that an idea of colonialism is advocated by Joseph Conrad, the one who has created Marlow - the piece's narrator and lead character.
Year
Issue
1-2
Pages
277-289
Physical description
Document type
ARTICLE
Contributors
author
  • Zofia Mitosek, Uniwersytet Warszawski,,ul. Krakowskie Przedmiescie 26/28, 00-927 Warszawa, Poland
References
Document Type
Publication order reference
Identifiers
CEJSH db identifier
09PLAAAA067011
YADDA identifier
bwmeta1.element.52442d20-bda7-39aa-94e7-0c2f4fec6ade
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