PL EN


2005 | 18 | 105-122
Article title

INDIA'S POSITION IN INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS AT THE TURN OF THE CENTURY

Authors
Title variants
Languages of publication
EN
Abstracts
EN
The article aimed at presenting India's position in international relations after the Cold War. It was based on studies concerning the international political situation at the turn of the 20th century and its influence on India. For New Delhi, the end of the Cold War meant a new strategic situation. However, India did not give up on creating a security zone in South Asia, or playing the role of a regional and future global power. It is not only India's current potential, but also its tradition and history which point to the fact that the country is destined to play major role in Asia and in the world. India not only attempts to improve and expand its economic and military potential, but also to actively participate in international political, economic and cultural relations. Thanks to its economic reforms, modernized army, developing nuclear programme and geopolitical situation following the end of the Cold War, India can already be considered an emerging power. India's position is significant because of its geographic location. It's position in the international relations is also influenced by demographic indicators (the population of India is the second largest in the world). India's importance in modern international relations was achieved thanks to economic development in the last fifteen years. The key to the economic speed-up have been internal reforms, opening up to foreign investment, an increase in domestic investment, higher productivity and structural changes. Now, for India it is of primary importance to modernize the army and increase military expenditure, as military potential is a key factor in major-power status. India is sill inferior to major powers in arms expenditure, as well as the quantity of conventional and nuclear weapons. Indicators from the social sphere must be taken into consideration, too. Recently, India was the only country in South Asia where despite an increase in population the absolute number of people living in poverty went down. However, this number is still quite high. The illiteracy rate is high, as well. The basic prerequisite for the future development of Indian society is improving the level of education and increasing investment in research and development. Despite its weaknesses, India is the prime candidate among developing countries to attain major-power status in the second decade of the 21st century.
Keywords
Year
Volume
18
Pages
105-122
Physical description
Document type
ARTICLE
Contributors
  • J. Zajaczkowski, Uniwersytet Warszawski, Instytut Stosunków Miedzynarodowych, ul. Zurawia 4, 00-503 Warszawa, Poland
References
Document Type
Publication order reference
Identifiers
CEJSH db identifier
06PLAAAA01302949
YADDA identifier
bwmeta1.element.548448c0-0715-3222-9aac-c4ffa144371b
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