PL EN


2007 | 6(83) | 13-44
Article title

THE ORIGINS AND EVOLUTION OF THE CONSTITUTION OF THE ITALIAN REPUBLIC

Title variants
Languages of publication
PL
Abstracts
EN
The author gives an analysis of circumstances in which the political systems and constitutional orders linked to them took place after World War II. As concerns Italy, he shares the position, prevailed in the doctrine, that it has not suffered the same fate as Germany and Japan nor has it been forced to implement a particular constitutional model, and that the Italian constitution was a result of decisions taken by national legislators. In Italy, the allies had left to the National Liberation Committee a relatively wide discretion in shaping a new, democratic system of government.. The author presents the trends in development of constitutions in the West and East of Europe, and indicates main differences between the Eastern and Western formulas of democracy. He also examines the changes of the form of the state and its government in the context of continuity of the Italian State as well as the main phases of the evolution of the basic law of 1947 until today. He provides a critical analysis of a constant Italian discussion on the reform of the system of government, including the constitutional debate taken in parliament of 15th term, particularly on how to improve the system to guarantee equality of both chambers of parliament and to strengthen the role of the government.
Year
Issue
Pages
13-44
Physical description
Document type
ARTICLE
Contributors
  • G. de Vergottini, University of Bologna, Italy
References
Document Type
Publication order reference
Identifiers
CEJSH db identifier
08PLAAAA03597289
YADDA identifier
bwmeta1.element.5b46ad70-c64b-3963-b5a7-a87ed9b3e61d
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