PL EN


2007 | 4 | 127-134
Article title

REPUBLICAN FOREIGN POLICY TENDENCIES IN THE TRUMAN YEARS: IDEAS, TRADITIONS, COMMENTARY

Authors
Title variants
Languages of publication
PL
Abstracts
EN
During the early stage of the Cold War, when the USA was busy devising a response to Soviet challenges at the time of the Harry S. Truman presidency, the Republican Party acted as a long-term opposition. This fact could have either led to the approval of the chief premises of the foreign policy realised by the ruling Democratic Party, or denoted a programme-like rejection. An analysis of writings by three distinguished Republican politicians - Herbert C. Hoover, John Foster Dulles and Robert Taft - shows the manner in which the American foreign policy strategy, based on the so-called non-party consensus, was created. The above-mentioned politicians and the Truman Administration shared a tendency to perceive the Soviet threat not only as one posed by a competitive power but predominantly by a communist state. At the same time, it was precisely under this Administration that the Republicans conceived assorted ideas and projects - frequently as a response to Democratic errors, or as own conceptions of waging the Cold War; subsequently, after winning the residential elections in 1953, these notions became gradually implemented. A survey of Republican ideas from the titular period, and especially those proposed by Senator Taft, could also lead to a better understanding of the consequences of the present-day foreign policy.
Contributors
author
  • J. Karaagac, University of Richmond, USA.
References
Document Type
Publication order reference
Identifiers
CEJSH db identifier
08PLAAAA05249945
YADDA identifier
bwmeta1.element.65257f9b-aae8-3c76-84c8-b8163b4e01cf
JavaScript is turned off in your web browser. Turn it on to take full advantage of this site, then refresh the page.