PL EN


2005 | 31 | 4(118) | 129-140
Article title

ASSIMILATION AND ITS DISCONTENTS: THE MURDER OF ALVIN PALMER AND CHICAGO'S POLONIA IN THE 1950s

Authors
Title variants
Languages of publication
EN
Abstracts
EN
On March 11, 1957 a gang of Chicago teenagers assaulted and killed a sixteen-year-old African American boy, Alvin Palmer. Many of the members of the 'Rebels', a street gang from the Back of the Yards neighborhood were Polish Americans and members of Sacred Heart Parish. The paper looks at both the gang and the neighborhood in an attempt to see the effects of assimilation on Chicago's Polonia. Chicago's Polonia had a long established history of juvenile delinquency. Many Polish American youth were members of mixed-ethnic gangs as they became assimilated into the life of Chicago's streets. The State's Attorney, Benjamin Adamowski, quickly brought charges against the members of the Rebels involved in the Palmer murder and called for their execution. The randomness of the event and the character of the Rebels involved in the murder sheds a good deal of light on Chicago's postwar racial conflicts.
Discipline
Year
Volume
31
Issue
Pages
129-140
Physical description
Document type
ARTICLE
Contributors
author
  • D. Pacyga, Columbia College/Chicago, 600 S. Michigan Ave, Chicago, Illinois 60605, USA
References
Document Type
Publication order reference
Identifiers
CEJSH db identifier
06PLAAAA01142647
YADDA identifier
bwmeta1.element.6ed713e5-0d84-3274-a535-029d0724ec2a
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