PL EN


2007 | 3(105) | 128-141
Article title

Seeing through language

Authors
Title variants
Languages of publication
PL
Abstracts
EN
This essay attempts at offering an answer to the question how the metaphor of 'seeing through language' should be understood. The author considers three popular interpretations: language as a medium reproducing the external world; language as a hermetic curtain drawn between us and the world; and, language as a semitransparent substance that embellishes the perceived world in a specific way. And, he comes to the conclusion that each of them has some essential defects to it. Instead, the author proposes his own non-metaphorical interpretation: namely, we perceive the world through, or, owing to, having language - that is, a special organ (not being an intermediary) that along with other organs (eyes, ears, etc.) enables us to enter into direct contact with our environment, but also, as opposed to any other organs, to acquire propositional knowledge. Further on, he analyses arguments against the 'language of thought' hypothesis; he considers the relation between perceptual beliefs and the world; and, analyses base conditions proving indispensable for language acquisition and formation of thinking. The conclusion comes out of the author's meticulous considerations that the abilities to speak, perceive, and think develop together, gradually.
Year
Issue
Pages
128-141
Physical description
Document type
ARTICLE
Contributors
author
  • The author passed away
References
Document Type
Publication order reference
Identifiers
CEJSH db identifier
07PLAAAA02895901
YADDA identifier
bwmeta1.element.86182fde-e7a2-3fe6-b34b-e13b55508d65
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