PL EN


2006 | 55 | 1 | 43-56
Article title

FRIEDRICH NIETZSCHE'S IDEA OF 'THE DANCING ÜBERMENSCH' IN THE POETRY BY VASYL PACHOVSKII

Authors
Title variants
Languages of publication
PL
Abstracts
EN
The end of the 19th and early 20th century was the time when people became interested in the art of dance to a great degree. The fact that the art of dance became so popular is related to Friedrich Nietzsche's philosophical thought: Nietzsche determined dance as one of the main categories of his philosophy. The philosopher gave the fullest form to his idea of dance in the character of Zarathustra. Zarathustra referred to dance while expressing both feelings and opinions. The authoress of the article discusses the concept of “the Dancing Übermensch” in relation to 'The Eagle's Flight', a poem by Vasyl Pachovskii. She also adapts the broad and multi-aspect context of other Nietzschean categories of 'genius', 'free spirit', and 'the promethean man', interpreting them from the point of view of the round dance movement forms presented in Pachovskii's text, which the Ukrainian artist associates with the universal symbols of an ideal method of gnosis, reflecting an active, cognitive, and transformative human attitude to one's reality and to oneself. In this way, Pachovskii implies that an individual can be fulfilled only by means of physical and spiritual effort and only then does an individual become an 'Übermensch', that is an artist, a creator fulfilling one's life in the realm of art in the only possible way: the never-ending dance.
Keywords
EN
Year
Volume
55
Issue
1
Pages
43-56
Physical description
Document type
ARTICLE
Contributors
author
  • A. Matusiak, Uniwersytet Wroclawski, Zaklad Ukrainistyki, ul. Pocztowa 9, 53-313 Wroclaw, Poland
References
Document Type
Publication order reference
Identifiers
CEJSH db identifier
06PLAAAA01072450
YADDA identifier
bwmeta1.element.908b0ecd-6b24-303a-bb6c-296cfb987dea
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