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2004 | 48 | 2(178) | 193-204

Article title

THE EARLY MEDIEVAL COIN HOARD FROM OTERKI NEAR RESZEL

Authors

Title variants

Languages of publication

PL

Abstracts

EN
In 1936 an early medieval hoard was found at an unspecified spot in the vicinity of Klein Ottern, Kreis Roessel (now Oterki, commune Reszel, Warminsko-Mazurskie Voivodeship). In the literature there was no information on the size and composition of the find. In 1978 the Museum of Warmia and Mazury in Olsztyn purchased 10 early medieval coins which allegedly came from the hoard dug out or ploughed out before the war at a place called 'Olerki' or something like that, near Reszel. Originally it was supposed to been part of a 'potful of coins'. The purchased coins are sure to be a small part of the Klein Ottern hoard. Here is the list of coins: Upper Lorraine: No 1, Verdun, Henry I (919-936) or an early imitation. This is the most interesting coin in the hoard. It differs from typical and popular imitations struck in Deventer in Ottonian times or that of Henry II. The specimen from Oterki might be supposed to have come from another older series of imitations; Lower Lorraine: No 2, Brussels, from the time of Conrad II (1024-1039); Franconia: No 3, Spira, from the years 1024-1044; No 4, Spira, from the years 1005-1044; No 5, Worms, from the time of Otto II or III (973-1002); No 6, Worms, from the time of Otto III and Henry II (983-1024). Upon the specimen there is a so far unrecorded form of the name of the mint: +VVORM CIVITAS, +VVORM CIVS or similar; No 7, Worms from the time of Conrad II (1024-1039); No 8, Worms, from the time of Conrad II (1024-1039); Hungary: No 9, Esztergom, Stephen I (1001-1038); No 10, imitation of the Cologne denarius. The Terminus post quem (1024) is marked out by coins struck during the reign of Conrad II.Since hoards of western European coins are pretty scarce in Prussian lands, for the sake of comparison similar finds from North–western Poland have been presented. The small number of 11th century hoards from Masuria seems to point out the fact that silver was not of particular importance in local markets or did not then perform the function of a means of commercial exchange. One might also suppose that the hoards are not connected with the Prussian market, i.e. they are 'outliers' from the Baltic zone. They might have been brought to Prussian lands by Merchant who certainly reached the Masurian interior. (1 figure)

Discipline

Year

Volume

48

Issue

Pages

193-204

Physical description

Document type

ARTICLE

Contributors

author
  • M. Bogucki, Instytut Archeologii i Etnologii PAN, al. Solidarnosci 105, 00-140 Warszawa, Poland

References

Document Type

Publication order reference

Identifiers

CEJSH db identifier
06PLAAAA01453217

YADDA identifier

bwmeta1.element.92391c64-aaf3-33cb-98e8-19822c3b7b17
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