PL EN


2009 | 46 | 2 | 144-166
Article title

Joseph Addison and General Education: Moral Didactics in Early Eighteenth-Century Britain

Authors
Content
Title variants
Languages of publication
EN
Abstracts
EN
Joseph Addison's (1672-1719) essays in The Spectator occupy contradictory positions in the history of aesthetics. While they are generally considered central to the institution of aesthetics as a scholarly discipline, their reception has throughout history entailed a strong questioning of their philosophical and scholarly importance. In the following paper, the author considers this dual feature as regards reception, and set out to clarify how this has come about. A re-examination of the arguments advanced by Addison makes clear that his role is not that of a philosopher, but that of a public educator. As such he aims to raise the standard of general education of the British 'middling orders' in the early eighteenth century, and by using art for didactic purposes he seeks to contribute to the shaping of morally accomplished individuals.
Year
Volume
46
Issue
2
Pages
144-166
Physical description
Document type
ARTICLE
Contributors
  • Karl Axelsson, Uppsala University, Sweden; http://dlib.lib.cas.cz/4675/
References
Document Type
Publication order reference
Identifiers
CEJSH db identifier
10CZAAAA07566
YADDA identifier
bwmeta1.element.94dfa388-72ed-3c8b-b2ba-e1ee192ae438
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