PL EN


2010 | 8 | 103-108
Article title

THE IMAGE OF NON-JEWS IN A TEXT BY ABRAMOVITCH: A CLOSE READING OF THE TRAVELS AND ADVENTURES OF BENJAMIN THE THIRD

Authors
Title variants
Languages of publication
EN
Abstracts
EN
In the nineteenth-century European literary tradition the Jew is represented as 'the Other'. The general image is a stereotypical description of the Jew as a parasite, a sorcerer or a villain. Even when one can specify and set down the linguistic, geographical and historical circumstances in which particular novels and stories were written, many of them incorporate the figure of 'the Jew' as a construct that plays a particular role in the narrative.1 Alongside the development of the European fiction, within the Jewish literary context, the new-Hebrew and Yiddish literatures are born and mature. The writers simultaneously bring in distinct features characteristic of the Jewish background, languages and context, while they also look towards European literary models and pattern their prose, to some extent, on the European style
Contributors
  • Katedra Judaistyki Uniwersytetu Jagiellonskiego ul. Jozefa 19, 31-056 Krakow, Poland
References
Document Type
Publication order reference
Identifiers
CEJSH db identifier
11PLAAAA102210
YADDA identifier
bwmeta1.element.9e50ad50-0d29-3c01-be2d-910d7f2bf319
JavaScript is turned off in your web browser. Turn it on to take full advantage of this site, then refresh the page.