PL EN


2009 | 8 | 4(25) | 517-528
Article title

PLATO, SHAKESPEARE, ACTORS, AND POPULAR CULTURE (Platon, Szekspir, aktorzy i kultura masowa)

Title variants
Languages of publication
PL
Abstracts
EN
The paper demonstrates Plato's efforts to emancipate reason from the influence of mythological tradition developed among others by 'myth-creative' mimetic art that plays at mass audience's heart strings (Plato's 'Ion' is watched by twenty-thousand strong audience). As a result, the sphere of affects were marginalized later on by Christianity. Shakespeare appears here as one of the first liberators of that affective sphere, and as a fighter for artists' dignity, especially theatre artists. Brecht appears as a representative of the next wave of emancipation, who, like Plato before him, tries to empower the public and make him a subject. The theme of an actor and the fight for his dignity is an example of development of the significance of individuality in Europe's history.
Keywords
Contributors
  • Aleksander Ochocki, Uniwerrsytet Warszawski, Instytut Filozofii, ul. Krakowskie Przedmiescie 3, 00-047 Warszawa, Poland
References
Document Type
Publication order reference
Identifiers
CEJSH db identifier
10PLAAAA077022
YADDA identifier
bwmeta1.element.9ef29885-a5b3-362e-b1cb-d46a81c20528
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