PL EN


2008 | 36 | 3 | 5-16
Article title

DIMENSIONS OF HEART

Authors
Title variants
Languages of publication
PL
Abstracts
EN
Short, but going into subject's depth, analysis of the classical conception of a human being as the triplet of Mind, Heart and Body is given. The crucial notion here, usually omitted, is the notion of Heart. It is, for sure, obscure. But it, in fact, is the key for the classical conception of a man, for Heart is just in the centre of the triplet. Chief results of author's analysis are: 1. The triplet under consideration can and has to be unified in the framework of the general networks' ontology. Its basic claim says that everything in the realm of the world is a network of nets, being often - Leibnizian idea - pieces of information concerning particular subjects (including you and me). 2. For thoughts, beliefs, feelings, emotions and sensations all are suitable representations (pictures) of appropriate objects (nets). 3. Heart is just in the centre of a human being. 4. Heart's content can be divided into three parts: the first - common with the mind, the third - common with the body and, last but not least, the second one - different from both and joining Mind with Body through mediations between pictures made by the mind and pictures made by the body. By the way, conjugate brain's mediations concern neurological counterparts of mediations mentioned above. 5. Heart has at least two dimensions: the first, the dimension of thinking and thoughts, more generally - of mental acts and pictures, and the second - the dimension of actions. 6. Principles of Mind and Principles of Heart, in Pascal's words - Logic of Mind and Logic of Heart, despite Pascal, have something important in common. 7. For Mind characteristic is thinking in a way rational and expressible in a language, whereas for Heart characteristic are feelings and intuitions, which are ways of seeing. 8. They are in part rational, in part - irrational. 9. There exists a bridge between (at least part of) Heart and Mind: Seeing searching intellects. 10. Final observation that the classical conception of a human being under discussion was developed by I. Kant in his critical philosophy. It is, the author thinks and sees, quite promising starting point for the modern, cognitive theory of human beings.
Keywords
Year
Volume
36
Issue
3
Pages
5-16
Physical description
Document type
ARTICLE
Contributors
  • J. Perzanowski, Uniwersytet Jagiellonski, Instytut Filozofii, ul.Grodzka 52, 31-044 Kraków, Poland
References
Document Type
Publication order reference
Identifiers
CEJSH db identifier
08PLAAAA05169818
YADDA identifier
bwmeta1.element.a0faa376-e1f8-3a6a-833a-3fd1394de763
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