PL EN


2008 | 3 | 81-90
Article title

WYKORZYSTYWANIE ŹRÓDEŁ ARCHIWALNYCH W PRACACH KONSERWATORSKICH

Authors
Content
Title variants
EN
AN EXAMINATION OF THE USE OF ARCHIVAL SOURCES TO INFORM CONSERVATION WORK
Languages of publication
PL
Abstracts
EN
When carrying out any conservation work it is vital to its success that it be well informed. Of the many potential sources of information which can be utilised during conservation work on historic buildings, archival sources are one of the most underused and undervalued. Such sources can reveal invaluable information about a buildings structure and construction. The use of such sources is a noninvasive means of discovering a significant amount of invaluable knowledge about a structure prior to work being carried out, information that even modern scientific investigative techniques will often be unable to reveal. Despite this, archival sources in their various forms are often only consulted as an afterthought when conservation work is well in progress. This article firstly examines exactly what is meant by archival sources and what forms these take. The sources which can be accessed whilst carrying out archival research to inform conservation work are many and varied and a range of these are examined in this article. These include: - Drawn evidence (plans, engineering drawings, paintings etc.); - Photographs - Written records (bills of quantity, specifications, contracts, descriptions etc.); - Books and catalogues - Film and sound records For each of these source types some notes are given on the different forms which they can take and on the information which can be drawn from the sources to inform conservation work. In many cases practical examples of how such sources have been utilised in the past are provided. For example, accounts can reveal the source of materials used in a building which provides a conservation team with an accurate, non-invasive investigative technique for material matching. Plans can reveal information about a buildings structure and layout that may not be apparent otherwise or which has changed over time. Photographs give an image of the appearance of a building at a particular juncture greatly informing conservation work as to fine detail of a buildings appearance and structure which could not be discerned otherwise. The article then considers 2 case studies where archival sources were used to inform conservation work, the Kibble Palace in Glasgow and the Martyrs Monument in Stirling. The Kibble Palace is a large glass house and archival sources of various types were used extensively to inform the repair and conservation work carried out in recent years. Likewise, archival sources were used to provide information on the original form of many elements during the restoration and repair work at the Martyrs Monument in Stirling. It is hoped these studies will provide readers with further practical examples of the important role archive sources can play in building conservation.
Year
Issue
3
Pages
81-90
Physical description
Document type
ARTICLE
Dates
published
2008
Contributors
author
  • pracuje od czterech lat dla Historic Scotland – organizacji odpowiedzialnej za ochronę AN EXAMINATION OF THE USE OF ARCHIVAL SOURCES TO INFORM CONSERVATION WORK When carrying out any conservation work it is vital to its success that it be well informed. Of the many potential sources of information which can be utilised during conservation work on historic buildings, archival sources are one of the most underused and undervalued. Such sources can reveal invaluable information about a buildings structure and construction. The use of such sources is a noninvasive means of discovering a significant amount of invaluable knowledge about a structure prior to work being carried out, information that even modern scientific investigative techniques will often be unable to reveal. Despite this, archival sources in their various forms are often only consulted as an afterthought when conservation work is well in progress. This article firstly examines exactly what is meant by archival sources and what forms these take. The sources which can be accessed whilst carrying out archival research to inform conservation work are many and varied and a range of these are examined in this article. These include: • Drawn evidence (plans, engineering drawings, paintings etc.) • Photographs • Written records (bills of quantity, specifications, contracts, descriptions etc.) • Books and catalogues • Film and sound records For each of these source types some notes are given on the different forms which they can take and on the information which can be drawn from the sources to inform conservation work. In many cases practical examples of how such sources have been utilised in the past are provided. For example, accounts can reveal the source of materials used in a building which provides a conservation team with an accurate, non-invasive investigative technique for material matching. Plans can reveal information about a buildings structure and layout that may not be apparent otherwise or which has changed over time. Photographs give an image of the appearance of a building at a particular juncture greatly informing conservation work as to fine detail of a buildings appearance and structure which could not be discerned otherwise. The article then considers 2 case studies where archival sources were used to inform conservation work, the Kibble Palace in Glasgow and the Martyrs Monument in Stirling. The Kibble Palace is a large glass house and archival sources of various types were used extensively to inform the repair and conservation work carried out in recent years. Likewise, archival sources were used to provide information on the original form of many elements during the restoration and repair work at the Martyrs Monument in Stirling. It is hoped these studies will provide readers with further practical examples of the important role archive sources can play in building conservation. 1. Przykładem może być Bonnington Bond w Leith. 2. Pełna historia prac badawczych i opis projektu konserwacji fontanny w: N. Ashurst, The Investigation, Repair and Conservation of the Doulton Fountain, Historic Scotland, Edinburgh 2008. 3. Archiwum Blair Castle, Papers relating to Stanley Mill. 4. Archiwa Perth, PE/WC PE20, teczka 5. 5. Archiwa Perth, PE/WC PE20, teczka 11. 6. Jako źródło pisane posłużyła gazeta „Stirling Observer” z dnia 20 czerwca 1867 r., s. 4. 7. Informację tę zaczerpnięto ze „Stirling Observer” z dnia 7 kwietnia 1859, s. 3. Fragment pochodzi z Listu do Rzymian 8, 34-35. Przypisy budowlanego dziedzictwa Szkocji – jako starszy specjalista zajmujący się technicznymi aspektami zabytkowej architektury (Senior Technical Officer). Stopnie naukowe w dziedzinie historii uzyskał na uniwersytetach w Stirling i Glasgow. Obecnie prowadzi badania nad kilkoma zagadnieniami związanymi z dziedzictwem budowlanym, jak np. tradycyjne konstrukcje murarskie w Szkocji czy sposoby zapewniania wydajności energetycznej w zabytkowych budynkach.
  • Mosese Jenkins, Historic Scotland, for postal address contact the journal editor
References
Document Type
Publication order reference
Identifiers
CEJSH db identifier
10PLAAAA079914
ISSN
0029-8247
YADDA identifier
bwmeta1.element.bf040a53-1aee-3df2-8614-e63b8c852faf
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