PL EN


2011 | 109 | 4 | 821-833
Article title

Evropská tradice britského dějepisectví

Authors
Title variants
EN
THE EUROPEAN TRADITION OF BRITISH HISTORIOGRAPHY
Languages of publication
CS
Abstracts
EN
Based on two recent publications by the Regius Professors of Modern History in Oxford and Cambridge, Robert and Richard Evans, this review article discusses the long-standing professional relationship of British historians with the European Continent. For several reasons, the early made distinction between British and European history persists to this day, and the latter forms the second, albeit smaller and in the history of historiography often neglected, core of the British historiographical tradition. What is more, both Evanses argue that British scholarship on the history of Continental Europe has been remarkably influential, at home as well as abroad. The reasons for this “success story” are manifold and provide us, among others, with an insight into the diversity of the national “history markets”. It becomes obvious that European historians should engage in a debate on the degree of openness of their communities to insights from outside, because: despite all the claims of internationalisation and globalisation, historians do not always practise what they preach – neither in Britain nor on the Continent.
Discipline
Year
Volume
109
Issue
4
Pages
821-833
Physical description
Contributors
  • Institut mezinarodních studií, Fakulta socialních věd Univerzity Karlovy v Praze, U Kříže 8, 150 00 Praha 5, Czech Republic
References
Document Type
Publication order reference
Identifiers
YADDA identifier
bwmeta1.element.cejsh-25753601-e49b-4a8d-935e-edd4e6d51737
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