PL EN


Journal
1998 | I | 53-65
Article title

Chiny a prawa człowieka

Authors
Content
Title variants
EN
China and human rights
Languages of publication
PL
Abstracts
EN
The Universal Declaration of Human Rights adopted in San Francisco stressed that human rights are indivisible and inalienable and that human dignity is inviolable. However, it continues to be a controversy over how human dignity can be best manifested. In the Chinese history of ideas no evidence can be found to support the thesis that inalienable human rights stem from human nature. Since the 1970s human rights have been a subject of discussion in China. Previously, the human rights notion was characterised as an imperialist institution. While the western countries see in personal dignity consistency with the development of democracy and pluralism, China maintains that it is providing the conditions for existence that creates the universal dignity of human beings. Priority is given to the people's rights to existence, development and wellbeing, which means that the most important thing is to provide the population with. food, clothing and shelter. Human rights in China is one of the most explosive political themes in debates between the West and China. The more China opens up, the more political, economic and cultural contacts will be created, improving the prospects for democratisation and human rights situation in China.
Keywords
Journal
Year
Issue
I
Pages
53-65
Physical description
Dates
published
1998
Contributors
author
References
Document Type
Publication order reference
Identifiers
YADDA identifier
bwmeta1.element.cejsh-ac76dbc7-b44d-4b39-bfd7-521c5fa1803b
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