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2020 | 75 | 3 | 237 – 250
Article title

WHAT IS THAT WHICH IS ALWAYS BECOMING, AND WHAT IS THAT WHICH ALWAYS IS?

Content
Title variants
Languages of publication
EN
Abstracts
EN
This paper explores the Neoplatonic interpretations of the distinction that Plato draws at the beginning of Timaeus (27d6 – 28a1) between “that which always is and has no becoming” and “that which is always becoming but never is”. Philoponustriesto show that Plato understands “generated” in the sense of “generated in time”, rejecting Aristotle’s incompatible thesis. According to the Neoplatonic reading that Plotinus inaugurates, and Porphyry subsequently develops, “generated” (γενητóν) has two meanings: to depend on a cause and to exist by virtue of a composition. The first meaning is assigned to the incorporeal – the Intelligence and the Soul; the two meanings, on the other hand, are assigned to bodies. The Intelligence depends on a cause, the One-Good; and, in turn, the Soul depends on a cause, the Intelligence. These realities are not in the range of “that which is always generated and never is”, but of “that which always is and is not generated”, i.e. of “that which is without ceasing to be”.
Keywords
Year
Volume
75
Issue
3
Pages
237 – 250
Physical description
Contributors
  • Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Madrid, Spain
References
Document Type
Publication order reference
YADDA identifier
bwmeta1.element.cejsh-b8694eae-162d-464d-9030-f68990a0e271
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