PL EN


2012 | 67 | 4 | 282 – 290
Article title

CARTESIAN IDEA OF GOD AS THE INFINITE

Title variants
Languages of publication
EN
Abstracts
EN
The paper discusses presuppositions of the so-called trademark argument for the existence of God presented by Rene Descartes (1596 – 1650) in his Meditations on First Philosophy. The author explores the interpretation of Descartes’s idea of God as the infinite that provides a response to a difficult philosophical and theological question: How can the human mind obtain a coherent idea of God, whose infinite and transcendent greatness reaches beyond reason? I propose a conceptual distinction to defend the Cartesian thesis, namely, that it is possible to have a clear and distinct idea of the infinite, while consistently sustaining the negative theological element of God as ultimately incomprehensible.
Keywords
Year
Volume
67
Issue
4
Pages
282 – 290
Physical description
Contributors
  • Saint Louis University Department of Philosophy, 3800 Lindell blvd, Saint Louis, MO 63108, USA
References
Document Type
Publication order reference
Identifiers
YADDA identifier
bwmeta1.element.cejsh-bc86e5c7-d30d-4bdc-823c-880e74976fb8
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