PL EN


Journal
2006 | 54 | 3 | 252-260
Article title

RUPTURE AND REFLECTION. ONE SKELETAL PATTERN FROM AROUND 1900

Authors
Title variants
Languages of publication
CS
Abstracts
EN
The starting point of the study is Antonin Slavicek's painting 'The Cottage in Kamenicky' (1904), with its central motif of the mirroring of the cottage on the surface of the pond. The article looks at the role of reflection in painting and photography at the turn of the 19th and 20th centuries in the main centres of European art. Treating specific examples, it points out the range of meaning and form, which, on the one hand, is defined for the senses by the potent example of mirroring, attracting the eyes, and on the other hand is defined conceptually by a contemplative balance, which captures the reflection in geometrical ideograms. The concept of the skeletal pattern is used to describe these contradictory approaches to a single motif. The role of this concept, deeply anchored in human thought, allows for a wide range of visualisation. The study demonstrates that before an individual perceives a state of nature, he or she has already been prepared to do so by the habits of consciousness, which form a relationship between the horizon and the two parts that it separates - the part above it and the part below it. The relation between these three components creates various possibilities, some of which may be suppressed or left out. Thus, a different correlation, which opened a way to go beyond realistic depiction, was introduced to the hanging painting and the photograph. This process of the transformation of the imitative depiction into abstraction took place very quickly. The reflection in a surface of water, which had been an integral part of landscape painting for many years, ceased to be an accompanying or secondary subject and became a theme of its own, contributing to the criticism of the realistic depiction. Three artists, Claude Monet, Gustav Klimt and Piet Mondrian, created model situations in this sense. In their work, the role of the skeletal pattern can be seen distinctly. The first two painters suppressed not only the situation above the surface, but the bank or horizon as well. Thus, all that emerged from the surface was an abstract space, a current that revealed action, independent of the cause of the reflection. Mondrian went even further: his ideas found expression in two methods at the same time. He suppressed the mirroring and consolidated the situation above the surface and below the surface in such a way that it was impossible to distinguish what was the upper and what the lower part. The hanging painting became a new unit, free from references outside itself. As soon as the skeletal pattern became a theme on its own, art was liberated from ties to the external motif. The path to the contemporary concept of the painting was opened up.
Keywords
Journal
Year
Volume
54
Issue
3
Pages
252-260
Physical description
Document type
ARTICLE
Contributors
author
  • K. Srp, Galerie hlavniho mesta Prahy, Mariánské nám. 1, 110 00 Prague, Czech Republic
References
Document Type
Publication order reference
Identifiers
CEJSH db identifier
06CZAAAA01623556
YADDA identifier
bwmeta1.element.dac65a1b-9f4a-32d3-909d-0adf92d14e92
JavaScript is turned off in your web browser. Turn it on to take full advantage of this site, then refresh the page.