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2021 | 10 | 2 | 293-319
Article title

The Moral Philosophy of Lucretius and Aquinas: Competing Ends and Means

Authors
Content
Title variants
Languages of publication
EN
Abstracts
EN
The author first explains wisdom and its importance to moral philosophy. Secondly, he follows with a consideration of the nature of things and the soul as told by Lucretius. Then he presents a brief summary on St. Thomas understanding of soul and how his faculty psychology is a superior explanation of moral philosophy. The author concludes by showing how Lucretius’ ethical system fails and to attain true happiness we must take up a faculty psychology aimed at virtue and the perfection of the soul, the principle form of the human person.
Year
Volume
10
Issue
2
Pages
293-319
Physical description
Dates
published
2021-06-30
Contributors
author
References
  • Aquinas, Thomas. Commentary on Aristotle’s De Anima. Translated by Kenelm Foster, O.P., and Sylvester Humphries, O.P. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1951.
  • Aquinas, Thomas. Commentary on Aristotle’s Physics. Translated by Richard J. Blackwell, Richard J. Spath & W. Edmund Thirlkel. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1963.
  • Aquinas, Thomas. Commentary on the Nicomachean Ethics. Translated by C. I. Litzinger, O.P. Henry Regnery Company 1964.
  • Lucretius. On the Nature of Things. Translated by William Ellery Leonard. Kindle Book. Available online at: http://classics.mit.edu//Carus/nature_things.html. Accessed Mar. 21, 2021.
  • Redpath, Peter A. The Moral Psychology of St. Thomas Aquinas: An Introduction to Ragamuffin Ethics. St. Louis: En Route Books & Media, 2019, Kindle edition.
Notes
EN
DOI: 10.26385/SG.100212
Document Type
Publication order reference
Identifiers
YADDA identifier
bwmeta1.element.desklight-07848007-c10c-455c-b227-c51614e0ccef
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