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2009 | 9 | 2 | i-iv
Article title

PROSPECTS FOR LEARNING DESIGN RESEARCH AND LAMS

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Content
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Languages of publication
EN
Abstracts
EN
Learning Design is a descriptive framework for activity structures that can describe many different pedagogical methods. It is similar to music notation, which can describe many styles of music using a common format, but Learning Design needs further research to be an effective format for sharing good teaching ideas among educators. Learning Design may also provide benefits for traditional educational research through more precise descriptions of educational innovations, which could allow for better control of confounding factors, and through rich records of student performance. Effective sharing of research-based Learning Designs has great potential for the future of teaching and learning.
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Year
Volume
9
Issue
2
Pages
i-iv
Physical description
Contributors
author
References
  • Dalziel, J. R. (2003) Implementing Learning Design: The Learning Activity Management System (LAMS). In G.
  • Crisp, D. Thiele, I. Scholten, S. Barker and J. Baron (Eds.), Interact, Integrate, Impact: Proceedings of
  • the 20th Annual Conference of the Australasian Society for Computers in Learning in Tertiary
  • Education. Adelaide, 7-10 December 2003. Retrieved 25th May 2009 from
  • http://ascilite.org.au/conferences/adelaide03/docs/pdf/593.pdf
  • Dalziel, J. R. (2007). New steps for LAMS and Learning Design: Bug fixes, branching and Pedagogic Planners.
  • Presentation for the 2007 European LAMS Conference, 5th July, 2007, London, Retrieved 25th May
  • 2009 from http://www.lamsfoundation.org/lams2007/slides/EuropeanLAMSconference.DalzielKeynote.
  • ppt
  • Koper, R. (2001). Modeling Units of Study from a pedagogical perspective: The pedagogical metamodel behind
  • EML. Technical Report, Open University of the Nederland (OUNL), Retrieved 25th May 2009 from
  • http://dspace.ou.nl/dspace/bitstream/1820/36/1/Pedagogical metamodel behind EMLv2.pdf
  • Russell, T. L. (1999) The No Significant Difference Phenomenon. Raleigh: The International Distance Education
  • Certification Center, North Carolina State University.
Document Type
Publication order reference
Identifiers
YADDA identifier
bwmeta1.element.desklight-1a61fafc-b30a-4285-84ab-dbabd6268a95
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