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2014 | 2014 6(101) Uncertainty in a Flattening World: Challenges for IHRM | 103-115
Article title

Cultural Determinants of Absenteeism and Presenteeism in a Multinational Environment

Title variants
Languages of publication
EN
Abstracts
EN
The aim of this article is to present the primary cultural factors that differentiate the level of absenteeism and presenteeism in a multicultural society. The indicated factors are related to both the inner motivation of the employee and the work environment itself. The article also attempts to answer two questions that are important from the perspective of managing human resources: How does culture influence the level of absenteeism and presenteeism at work and how can absenteeism in a multicultural environment be managed? In order to achieve this aim, a review of literature covering absenteeism in a multicultural society was performed. The results of research related to the factors creating a culture of absenteeism were analyzed and an attempt has been made to determine how differences in aspects of national cultures influence it.
Year
Pages
103-115
Physical description
Dates
published
2014-12-15
Contributors
References
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Notes
EN
The polish version of this article was published on free CD added to the paper version HRM(ZZL) 2014 6(101) [look at: Zarzadzanie Zasobami Ludzkimi 2014 6(101)] .
Document Type
Publication order reference
Identifiers
ISSN
1641-0882
YADDA identifier
bwmeta1.element.desklight-279b88b3-2a91-42d5-b0ab-3399d65e996c
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