PL EN


2015 | 5 | 2 | 121-167
Article title

Germany and the Boxer Uprising in China

Authors
Title variants
Languages of publication
EN
Abstracts
EN
In late 1890’s, a xenophobic Yihetuan (“Boxer”) movement emerged in German sphere of influence in Shandong. In 1900, the movement spread into the neighbouring province of Zhili and was largely tolerated by anti-foreign officials. Foreign diplomats failed to understand this threat. As a consequence of hasty and miscalculated moves of both sides, the Chinese court found itself in the middle of an open conflict with the great powers. Since mid-June, foreign detachments were fighting with governmental troops in Zhili; on June 20, German Minister to China was killed and the siege of the Beijing legations began. German forces in the Far East were too limited to participate much on the fighting. Germany sent a large expeditionary force to the Far East, but these troops arrived too late to take part on the conquest of Beijing on 14 August 1900. Allied forces under supreme command of German Field Marshall Alfred von Waldersee occupied Zhili and conducted many punitive operations at the country. During the crisis, Germany gained bad reputation for the conduct of her troops.
Discipline
Year
Volume
5
Issue
2
Pages
121-167
Physical description
Contributors
author
  • Military History Institute in Prague, U Památníku 2, 130 05 Praha 3, Czech Republic, jankocvar@seznam.cz
References
Document Type
Publication order reference
Identifiers
YADDA identifier
bwmeta1.element.desklight-2b96b412-2a22-481f-b50f-f957625c45db
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