PL EN


2013 | 2 | 4 | 5-18
Article title

BRINGING THE KNOWLEDGE COMPONENTS OF PHYSICAL ACTIVITY EDUCATION (INCLUDING SPORT) TO THE PRACTICING PHYSICAL ACTIVITY EDUCATOR

Content
Title variants
Languages of publication
EN
Abstracts
The field of physical (activity) and health education, or whatever it is called in any one of the world’s countries, has undergone a “determined” but often “confused” development in the 20th century. After Sputnik went up in 1957, the field sought help from a variety of disciplines (e.g., kinesiology) and professions (e.g., management) in an attempt to truly define itself. Building on what Arthur Steinhaus (George Williams College) stated were its four “principal principles” in the early 1950s, the author asserts that some 14 “principal principles” of the field can now be affirmed. Searching for consensus, a proposed taxonomy for “developmental physical activity in exercise, sport, and physical recreation” is offered here for consideration as the field moves along in the 21st century. The author argues that the field also needs to make available to the professional practitioner a computerized inventory of generalizations that represents a distillation of the field’s scientific and scholarly literature.
Year
Volume
2
Issue
4
Pages
5-18
Physical description
Dates
published
2013
Contributors
References
  • 1. Berelson, B., & Steiner, G.A. (1964). Human behavior: An inventory of scientific findings. NY: Harcourt, Brace & World.
  • 2. Gillis, Jacqueline. (1987). Telltale dissertations in physical education: What do they say about specialization? Quest, 39 (2), 142-152.
  • 3. Research Council of the American Association for Health, Physical Education, and Recreation. (1960). The contributions of physical activity to human well-being. Research Quarterly, 31(2, Pt II), 261-375.
  • 4. Steinhaus, A.H. (1952) Principal principles of physical education. Proceedings of the College Physical Education Association. Washington, D.C.: AAHPERD, 5:1.
  • 5. Zeigler, E. F. (1979). The past, present, and recommended future development in physical education and sport in North America. In Proceedings of The American Academy of Physical Education (G.M. Scott (Ed.), Washington, DC: The American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation, and Dance.
  • 6. Zeigler, E.F. (1980). The past, present, and recommended future development in physical education and sport in North America. In Proceedings of The American Academy of Physical Education (G.M.Scott, Ed.). Washington, DC: AAHPERD, pp. 9-19.
  • 7. Zeigler, E.F. (1980). A systems approach to the development and use of theory and research in sport and physical education. Sportwissenschaft, 10(4), 404-416.
  • 8. Zeigler, E.F. (1994). Physical education's 13 Principal Principles. JOPERD, 65, 7: 4-5.
  • 9. Zeigler, E.F. (1995) Les 13 principes principauz de l'education physique. CAHPERD Journal, 61: 1: 22-23
  • 10. Zeigler, E.F.(ed. & author). (1995). Physical education and Kinesiology in North America: Professional & Scholarly Foundations. Champaign, IL: Stipes. (Other contributions were By L.J. Huelster (dec.), J.S. Skinner, A.V. Carron, S.L. Greendorfer, M.G. Wade, G.A. Leyshon, M.J.L. Alexander, D.G. Soucie, A.E. Jewett, & B.D. Franks.)
  • 11. Zeigler, E. F. (1997). Physical education’s 13 principal principles. JPESS, XI1&2:27-31.
  • 12. Zeigler, E.F. (2002). Socio-cultural foundations of physical education and educational sport. Aachen, Germany: Meyer & Meyer.
  • 13. Zeigler, E. F. (2011). A new “principal principle” (#14) of physical activity education is emerging. The Physical Educator, 68, 3:113-116.
Document Type
Publication order reference
Identifiers
YADDA identifier
bwmeta1.element.desklight-2be54ee7-6acf-486f-9fa6-0103938b86ee
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