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2010 | 15 | 1 | 119-140
Article title

Comfort in Annihilation: Three Studies in Materialism and Mortality

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Abstracts
EN
This paper considers three accounts of the relationship between personal immortality and materialism. In particular, the pagan mortalism of the Epicureans is compared with the Christian mortalism of Thomas Hobbes and John Locke. It is argued 1) that there are significant similarities between these views, 2) that Locke and Hobbes were, to some extent, influenced by the Epicureans, and 3) that the relation between (im)mortality and (im)materialism is not as straightforward as is commonly supposed.
Year
Volume
15
Issue
1
Pages
119-140
Physical description
Dates
published
2010
Contributors
author
  • Trent University
author
  • Trent University
References
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Notes
EN
This paper is written with equal contributions from both authors. Byron Stoyles is primarily responsible for the sections focusing on Epicurus and Liam Dempsey for the sections focusing on Locke. Both authors contributed to the sections focusing on Hobbes.
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bwmeta1.element.desklight-33512f9c-c20d-4990-98e2-bf27cd1cdcdf
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