PL EN


2015 | 38 | 237-260
Article title

Edmund Burke – ostatni syn Rewolucji Chwalebnej

Authors
Content
Title variants
Languages of publication
PL
Abstracts
EN
The Author demonstrates that in his Reflections and Appeal Edmund Burke argued against the New Whigs’ interpretation of Glorious Revolution. Instead, he gave an Old Whig’ defence of it. Accordingly, the English had not created a new regime but, rather, they restored the old one previously distorted by the Stuarts. Thus, the Revolution was carried out exclusively to preserve the old laws and liberties of Ancient Constitution. In fact, Burke rejected the idea of abstract, metaphysical freedom and defended the notion of freedom deeply rooted in the national heritage including the institutions of Ancient Constitution and the common law tradition. The Author points out that, for Burke, the national institutions, customs, values and liberties were a result of centuries’ long political experiences and social practices. Therefore, Burke used his argument to defend the Ancient liberties of the English as understood by the Old Whigs and to demolish the rationalistic speculations on freedom as practiced by the New Whigs. All in all, the Author claims that defending the Glorious Revolution in this way Burke proved himself to be the last Old Whig.
Year
Volume
38
Pages
237-260
Physical description
Contributors
References
Document Type
Publication order reference
Identifiers
YADDA identifier
bwmeta1.element.desklight-4ba909bf-df89-4bb1-ae83-1581b80f8fe3
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