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2019 | 5 (19) | 1 | 3-11
Article title

Globalization, inequality and economic policy

Content
Title variants
Languages of publication
EN
Abstracts
EN
In our paper a very simple model is used to analyze the relationship between trade globalization, inequality and economic policy. Although the local government exclusively maximizes the welfare of the marginalized (unemployed) people, the inequality of relative consumption between employed and unemployed will increase with intensified trade liberalization. In contrast to this result the relative income inequality may fall in certain situations.
Year
Volume
Issue
1
Pages
3-11
Physical description
Dates
published
2019-03-22
Contributors
author
  • Department of Business and Economics, School of International Studies (ZIS), Technische Universität Dresden, 01062 Dresden, Germany
  • Department of Business and Economics, School of International Studies (ZIS), Technische Universität Dresden, 01062 Dresden, Germany
  • Department of Economics, Jadavpur University, Kolkata, India
References
  • Alvaredo, F., Chancel, L., Piketty, T., Saez E. & Zucman, G. (2018). World inequality report 2018.
  • Atkinson, A.B. (2015). Inequality. What can be done? Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts.
  • Baldwin, R. & Wyplosz, C. (2015). The economics of European integration. 5th ed. London et al.
  • Basu, K. (2006). Globalization, poverty and inequality: what is the relationship? what can be done? World Development, 34, 1361-1373.
  • Basu, K. (2011). Groundwork for a new economics. Princeton University Press, Princeton, NJ.
  • Bourguignon, F. & S.R. Chakravarty, S.R. (2003). The measurement of multidimensional poverty. Journal of Economic Inequality, 1, 25-49.
  • Elbers, C., Lanjouw, P., Mistiaen, J.A. & Ölzer, B. (2008). Reinterpreting between group inequality. Journal of Economic Inequality, 6, 231-246.
  • Jomo, K.S. & Baudot (eds), J. (2007). Flat world, big gaps: economic liberalization, globalization, poverty and inequality. London, New York.
  • OECD (2015). In it together: why less inequality benefits all. Paris.
  • Piketty, T. (2014). Capital in the twenty-first century. Harvard University Press.
  • Rodrik, D. (2011). The globalization paradox: democrarcy and the future of the world economy. New York.
Document Type
Publication order reference
Identifiers
YADDA identifier
bwmeta1.element.desklight-56a16e84-1310-4344-b6a2-6bedcfe3f35d
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