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2013 | 1 | 54-68
Article title

Face, linguistic (im)politeness and polyphony in Thomas Hardy’s "Far from the Madding Crowd"

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EN
Abstracts
EN
Thomas Hardy’s novel "Far from the Madding Crowd" provides a stark contrast in how the characters project their face (Goffman 1967) and how they seek approval from others. Such a contrast can be analysed in terms of Bakhtin’s polyphony – the many voices found in a text which includes the author’s portrayal of his protagonists and how they interact with each other. In order to highlight this contrast and its way of coming across, I examine how three key characters in the novel, Gabriel Oak, Sergeant Frank Troy and William Boldwood, present themselves interpersonally. I use the concept of linguistic (im)politeness to demonstrate how the protagonists try to further themselves, especially in their pursuit of Bathsheba Everdene. I argue that a linguistic (im)politeness approach can also be applied to other novels of Thomas Hardy and indeed to a wider range of literature.
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Year
Issue
1
Pages
54-68
Physical description
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Publication order reference
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YADDA identifier
bwmeta1.element.desklight-5fc9783f-906a-4ae0-955c-c3ea47e81bdf
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