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Journal
2019 | 16 | 59 | 35-47
Article title

The Minimum Intelligent Signal Test (MIST) as an Alternative to the Turing Test

Content
Title variants
Languages of publication
EN
Abstracts
EN
The aim of this paper is to present and discuss the issue of the adequacy of the Minimum Intelligent Signal Test (MIST) as an alternative to the Turing Test. MIST has been proposed by Chris McKinstry as a better alternative to Turing’s original idea. Two of the main claims about MIST are that (1) MIST questions exploit commonsense knowledge and as a result are expected to be easy to answer for human beings and difficult for computer programs; and that (2) the MIST design aims at eliminating the problem of the role of judges in the test. To discuss these design assumptions we will present Peter D. Turney’s PMI-IR algorithm which allows for MIST-type questions to be answered. We will also present and discuss the results of our own study aimed at the judge problem for MIST.
Journal
Year
Volume
16
Issue
59
Pages
35-47
Physical description
Dates
published
2019-03-31
Contributors
  • Paweł Łupkowski, dr hab. Uniwersytet im. Adama Mickiewicza w Poznaniu Zakład Logiki i Kognitywisytki Instytut Psychologii Reasoning Research Group ul. Szamarzewskiego 89a Poznań, 60-568, pawel.lupkowski@gmail.com
  • Patrycja Jurowska, mgr Uniwersytet im. Adama Mickiewicza w Poznaniu Instytut Psychologii Reasoning Research Group ul. Szamarzewskiego 89a Poznań, 60-568, pjurowska@gmail.com
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Document Type
Publication order reference
Identifiers
YADDA identifier
bwmeta1.element.desklight-65cb36ea-895c-4a24-a46d-8659c1d66f77
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