PL EN


2014 | 1 | 193-208
Article title

Quia Ego Nominor Leo: Barthes, Stereotypes and Aesop’s Animals

Authors
Title variants
Languages of publication
EN
Abstracts
EN
Taking Barthes’ discussion of Aesop’s lion as my starting point, I examine the notion of the stereotype as it applies to the use of animals in philosophy and cultural theory. By employing an illustrative selection of animal ciphers from Saussure and Austin, and animal indices from Peirce and Schopenhauer, I argue that theory’s beasts are always at risk of becoming either exemplars of a deadening, generic Animal or mere stultifying stereotypes. Gilbert Ryle’s faithful dog, Fido, as well as a number of Aesop’s edifying animals, help to demonstrate that these two dangers are not inescapable, however. I close by indicating two strategies for preventing the unnecessary inhibition of the creatures of critical theory, focusing on Derrida’s individual and gently unruly cat.
Keywords
EN
Aesop   animal   Austin   Barthes   cat   cipher   Derrida   dog   Fido   fox   horse   index   leo   lion   ox   Peirce   porcupine   Ryle   Saussure   Schopenhauer;   stereotype  
Contributors
author
  • Oxford Brookes University, UK
References
Document Type
Publication order reference
Identifiers
YADDA identifier
bwmeta1.element.desklight-72595c36-bc7a-4126-91c0-92cb9eb6a46f
JavaScript is turned off in your web browser. Turn it on to take full advantage of this site, then refresh the page.