PL EN


2013 | 2(22) | 153-182
Article title

Balast po komunizmie. Instytucjonalne rozliczenie komunizmu w krajach Europy Środkowej – opis struktur oraz okoliczności ich powstania

Content
Title variants
EN
The post-communist burden. Institutional settling accounts with communism in the central European countries – description of structures and circumstances of their emergence
Languages of publication
PL
Abstracts
EN
After knocking down communism in 1989, Poland and other countries of  Eastern Europe were burdened with a task of settling accounts with their totalitarian  past both in institutional dimension – through legal compensation for the victims  of crimes and persecutions, trying their perpetrators and developing institutional  standards preventing functionaries of the former communist secret services and  their co-workers from having an impact on public life (lustration) and also  enabling the victims to have an insight into the documents collected in the past on  them. Since, in the centre of the lustration debate an issue of exploring, developing  and settling accounts with one of fundamental pillars of the totalitarian system  i.e. former security forces was placed, one of the elements of settling accounts with  the communist past was the creation of institutions responsible for taking over the  archives of the communist special forces and revealing the network of agents of the  political secret service, as well, as conducting research and educational activities  in that area. The text analyses the conditions in which that process occurred in  Poland and her bordering countries: Germany, the Czech Republic, Slovakia and  Russia. The concluding paragraphs of the article contain the assessment that the  process of creating the institutions responsible for taking over the materials of the  state security organs, their development and making them available was a part  of a political ritual of transformation from totalitarianism to democracy. That  transformation was experienced by all post-communist countries of Central  Europe which chose a democratic variant of social development. The institutions  established in order to accomplish that goal have similar competences apart from  investigative functions possessed only by the Polish Institute of National  Remembrance. Lesser successes were achieved as far as the attempts to legal persecution  of the perpetrators of communist crimes were concerned and it relates to the entire  geographical area. The state of law proved to be an inefficient tool in bringing the  guilty ones to justice within the course of passing years. Settling accounts with communism was never done in Russia. One may think  that  Russian  leaders  came  to  the  conclusion  that  society  is  not  ready  yet  for  such a move since it would entail huge social and political costs and that its full realisation would be possible only after the natural generation exchange has been accomplished.  The author puts forward a thesis that a future researcher of the  history of the post-communist era in Europe will be able to clearly distinguish the  borderlines of the countries which have settled their accounts with a totalitarian  past and of those where this has not been done with all the system, social and  moral consequences of that fact.
Contributors
References
Document Type
Publication order reference
Identifiers
YADDA identifier
bwmeta1.element.desklight-7425d51c-2554-4638-9b37-d89be1ec9005
JavaScript is turned off in your web browser. Turn it on to take full advantage of this site, then refresh the page.