PL EN


2015 | 4(30) | 5-15
Article title

Transition planning at the intersection of special education and inclusion

Selected contents from this journal
Title variants
PL
PLANOWANIE PRZEJŚCIA ZE SZKOŁY ŚREDNIEJ DO EDUKACJI POLICEALNEJ NA SKRZYŻOWANIU KSZTAŁCENIA SPECJALNEGO I EDUKACJI WŁĄCZAJĄCEJ
Languages of publication
PL EN
Abstracts
PL
Przejście ze szkoły średniej do edukacji policealnej i zatrudnienia może być wyzwaniem dla wszystkich uczniów, a szczególnie dla młodzieży z niepełnosprawnością intelektualną, w przypadku której ryzyko życia w ubóstwie jest wyższe niż u pełnosprawnych rówieśników. W Stanach Zjednoczonych poświęca się coraz większą uwagę okresowi przejścia uczniów z niepełnosprawnością intelektualną z okresu adolescencji w dorosłość. Jest on procesem o decydującym znaczeniu. W artykule omówiono wyzwania związane z okresem przejścia oraz opisano rolę specjalistów w tej dziedzinie, jeśli chodzi o zapewnienie skutecznych strategii wsparcia prowadzących do realizacji potrzeb uczniów z niepełnosprawnością intelektualną w zakresie przejścia ze szkoły średniej do edukacji policealnej.
EN
Transition from high school to postsecondary education (PSE) and employment can be challenging for all youth, and particularly for youth with intellectual disability (ID) who are more likely to remain in poverty than their peers without disabilities. In the United States, the critical transition period from adolescence to adulthood for students with ID is receiving increased attention. This article reviews transition challenges and describes the role of transition specialists in providing effective support strategies to meet the postsecondary transition needs of students with ID.
Contributors
author
  • University of Massachusetts, 100 Morrissey Blvd., Boston, MA 02125; tel. 617/287-7585;
  • University of Massachusetts, 100 Morrissey Blvd., Boston, MA 02125; tel. 617/287-7592;
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Document Type
Publication order reference
YADDA identifier
bwmeta1.element.desklight-7740b318-546d-43f8-8455-b7185f9dc1e9
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