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2015 | 18 | 39-50
Article title

Aristophanes, the accuser of Socrates: some sociolinguistic aspects of comedy

Title variants
Languages of publication
EN
Abstracts
EN
This paper examines the impact of verbal abuse typical of the old Attic comedy on the reputations of real-life citizens of Athens. It can be argued that the way in which comic poets insulted well-known people of their age shared many characteristics with the communicative strategies applied in everyday familiar speech. This may indicate that the only proper reaction to it consisted in accepting the ridicule as if it were not offensive.
Keywords
Year
Issue
18
Pages
39-50
Physical description
Contributors
  • Uniwersytet Jagielloński
References
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Document Type
Publication order reference
Identifiers
YADDA identifier
bwmeta1.element.desklight-7c070c35-5abf-4585-9c32-b28e2351b519
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