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2013 | 13 | 2 | 3-22
Article title

BETWEEN DEFERENCE AND DEMEANOR: THE OUTSTANDING MIND IN ONLINE COLLABORATION CONTEXTS. SOME INSIGHTS BASED ON THE FIVE-FACTOR MODEL OF PERSONALITY TRAITS

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EN
Abstracts
EN
The article looks at the problem of online collaboration vis à vis individual differences, with special regard to the converger learning style, also referred to – throughout the article – as the solitary outstanding mind. Based on a study of a group of such learners (N=11), utilizing a bifocal analysis of personality types determined by the NEO Five Factor Inventory together with student self-reflection journals, it is being argued here that for everybody to benefit from online co-operation, the teacher needs to sequence groupwork, intertwining it with phases of quiet individual effort; as well as carefully choose tasks remembering their specificity is a catalyser of genuine collaboration.
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Year
Volume
13
Issue
2
Pages
3-22
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author
References
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Publication order reference
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bwmeta1.element.desklight-d6eba971-98dc-4185-a728-b1eeedb49b8b
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