PL EN


2017 | 26 | 3 | 109-144
Article title

Pierwotny Kościół w konfrontacji do świata pogańskiego w świetle pism Nowego Testamentu

Authors
Content
Title variants
EN
Early Church in confrontation with pagan world in light of New Testament writings
Languages of publication
PL
Abstracts
EN
A particular attitude of the Early Church to pagans resulted from a “theological necessity” to proclaim the Gospel to all people (Mt 29:19). This universal aspect of early Christianity is often present in the New Testament (1 Tm 2:3). The analysis of some texts (Acts 13:13–52; 1 Cor 8:1–13; Gal 2:2–5:14) shows that mission among pagans was based on three theological premises: logic of God’s plan of salvation, knowledge of God revealed in Jesus Christ and the truth of the Gospel. They are exegetically presented and explained. Further we presented these aspects of pagan religiosity which would lead to conflicting situations with Christian communities: propriety/ impropriety of Christians eating pagan sacrifices (1 Cor 8:1–13), uncertainty about future and desire for ecstatic experiences and spiritual gifts (1 Cor 12–13) and unbelief in body resurrection. Explaining those aspects, the author attempts to present historical and cultural background of pagan religiosity based on the works of ancient writers. Another element of confrontation of New Testament writers with pagans is their constant stigmatizing of immoral pagan life. It is done both in many lists of offences, which include mainly sexual sins (generally called πορνεία) and in criticizing concrete immoral attitudes and desires (e.g. incest and homosexuality). Also pedophilia, though it is not directly listed in the New Testament, was very common in the pagan world and it completes the image of moral pagan corruption and undoubtedly could have been classified by saint Paul as sexual depravity – πορνεία (Ro 1:26-27). Finally, we confronted the attitude to manual labor in Jewish culture and in Greco-Roman culture. In Jewish culture we can talk about work ethos, which gave material means for support and did not disturb more spiritual work, such as studying the Torah. In Greco-Roman culture manual work was despised. That resulted from a dominant humanistic ideal (Greek παιδεία, Latin otium), which demanded a total dedication to intellectual and personal development. Manual work was left for slaves.
Year
Volume
26
Issue
3
Pages
109-144
Physical description
Contributors
  • Katolicki Uniwersytet Lubelski Jana Pawła II
References
Document Type
Publication order reference
Identifiers
ISSN
1231-1634
YADDA identifier
bwmeta1.element.desklight-dac076d7-c4ab-4edc-956e-e54b06127a82
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