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2017 | 6(70) | 239-253
Article title

THE PREREQUISITES OF THE DEVELOPMENT OF COGNITIVE-GRAPHICS THEORY

Title variants
UK
Передумови розвитку когнітивно-графічної теорії.
Languages of publication
EN
Abstracts
EN
The analysis of historical development of cognitive-visual instruments demonstrated in Minoan and Egyptian hieroglyphic writing, Quipu^shri system, cartography, anatomical figures of Leonardo da Vinci, iconography is provided in the article. The linguistic functions of the unique block-diagram system of ligature hieroglyphic writing of Maya peoples are cleared out in the following investigation. It is found out that the block-diagram system was the prototype of modern cognitive-visual blocks, used in Mathematics, Physics, Computer Science and Pedagogics of today.It is revealed that the knot system “quipy^shri” of the Inca era can be considered one of the primary cognitive-graphic models of antiquity, because it was the instrument of centralized management and statistical accounting due to clearly developed visual nodal-rope account system. The paper presents the process of two-dimensional graphics development based on the production of the first geographical maps. The cartographic works from the simplest and primitive drawings to the serious scientific studies of Gerard Mercator and Edward Wright are taken into consideration in thepaper. The characteristic of anatomical figures of Leonardo da Vinci as a significant contribution to the development of primary infographics is carried out. The Orthodox icon and Tibetan tank are studied in detail as samples of primary cognitive visualization conveying complex religious and philosophical concepts and ways of moral and spiritual self-improvement with the help of certain symbols, colours and a set of signs.these symbols, colours and signs form unique religious graphical language understandable to representatives of various ethnic cultures and religions. The further investigation of historical roots of cognitive visualization will stimulate the emergence of new cognitive-visual instruments.
Contributors
References
Document Type
Publication order reference
YADDA identifier
bwmeta1.element.desklight-fe86918c-6493-47e1-9727-aabc395d4a49
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