PL EN


2007 | 7 | 5-13
Article title

Conditions, Processes, and Aims of Teacher Education: A Philosophical Perspective

Authors
Title variants
Languages of publication
EN
Abstracts
EN
The aim of this article is to provide a theoretical ground about teacher self-construction that is in harmony with his/her capabilities, natural environment, and society. The article initially considers the Blondelian philosophy of action as a specific philosophical view that forms an approach for teacher education: the primary concepts of action and synergy help consider the ontological dynamism of human life and its unavoidable conditions. In particular, the work on teacher prejudgements, considered as a system of conditions, is central in teacher education, as it represents a central and unavoidable condition. This reference to "conditions" is then articulated, in the specific case of teacher education, as the need to study the phenomenon of prejudgements, which can be considered the first step towards a greater awareness of educational and cultural skills. The third step of the article consists in "translating" these main issues of the philosophy of action into the idea of a performative process in the education of the teacher. According to philosophy of action, the article shows the performative character of teacher education processes, which is based on the pursuit of goals by activating all personal capacities.
Publisher
Year
Volume
7
Pages
5-13
Physical description
Dates
published
2007-01-01
online
2009-05-04
Contributors
  • University of Macerata, Italy
References
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Document Type
Publication order reference
Identifiers
YADDA identifier
bwmeta1.element.doi-10_2478_v10099-009-0001-x
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