PL EN


2005 | 14 | 4(56) | 199-211
Article title

The Idea of God in Sartre's Philosophy

Authors
Title variants
Languages of publication
PL
Abstracts
EN
Pointing to the difference between 'en-soi' and 'pour-soi' the author holds that although Sartre was a staunch atheist in all he has written, he was also a consistent anti-materialist. For Sartre we are material only insofar as we have to exist as a physical 'en-soi'. Other than that we have a moral and intellectual obligation to identify with 'pour-soi'. By adopting this distinction Sartre can retain his conception of human condition as undetermined and contingent. If he chose the materialist position, he would have to admit that we are fully determined by biological instincts and all efforts to establish human responsibility and 'l'engagement' would be doomed to failure. At the same time, however, Sartre passes by an opportunity to offer the human being a guidance for the transition from 'en-soi' to 'en-so', leaving this process basically in the hands of weak and frail individuals. This may be required by his conception of human responsibility, but irrespective of its motivation, his conception leaves man confused and disoriented. We are not prepared to live in a world without God, a world that is, in the author's own words 'like a piece of dead wood, or a dried bone or an empty shell'.
Keywords
Year
Volume
14
Issue
Pages
199-211
Physical description
Document type
ARTICLE
Contributors
author
  • R. Krol, Ciosaniec 112, 67-410 Slawa, Poland
References
Document Type
Publication order reference
Identifiers
CEJSH db identifier
06PLAAAA01232805
YADDA identifier
bwmeta1.element.e2f78b31-c6e4-38b1-8f55-0328f1778bb0
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