PL EN


Journal
2007 | 15 | 4(60) | 97-109
Article title

LAWS OF NATURE, SCIENTIFIC LAWS AND MIRACLES. CRITICISM OF HUME'S ARGUMENTS AGAINST MIRACLES

Authors
Title variants
Languages of publication
PL
Abstracts
EN
The author considers Hume's arguments against miracles and the notion of miracle. From Hume's perspective, miracles are violations of the laws of nature caused by the supernatural being or beings. In Part I of 'On Miracles' Hume argues that miracles can never be believed by a rational person. In Part II he attempts to demonstrate that there is actually no evidence for a miracle. Using distinction between laws of nature and scientific laws, and the deductive-nomological model of explanation, the author comes to some conclusions: (1) The Hume's arguments against miracles are not conclusive; (2) The Mackie's defense of Hume's arguments is unsatisfactory. Moreover, Mackie himself gives the reasons which weaken his and Hume's arguments against miracles; (3) There is consistent notion of miracle: miracle can be understood as a result of bursting supernatural factor into relatively isolated system of nature; (4) Miracles can occur without the violations of the laws of nature or the scientific law - the Hume's notion of miracle is incorrect.
Journal
Year
Volume
15
Issue
Pages
97-109
Physical description
Document type
ARTICLE
Contributors
author
  • A. Stepnik, Akademii Wychowania Fizycznego w Warszawie, Katedra Nauk Spolecznych, Zaklad Filozofii, ul. Marymoncka 34, 00-968 Warszawa, Poland
References
Document Type
Publication order reference
Identifiers
CEJSH db identifier
08PLAAAA03937812
YADDA identifier
bwmeta1.element.e60213ae-d22d-3454-811d-3982cb99e130
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