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2014 | 2 | 1 |
Article title

Intertextual Adaptability of the Character of Sherlock Holmes from Literature to Film Production

Content
Title variants
Languages of publication
Abstracts
EN
This study explores the theme of intertextuality and adaptation between literature and film on the basis of Sherlock Holmes, the 19th/20th-century character conceived by Arthur Conan Doyle. It shows how the character has been adapted from literature into the cinematic domain on the basis of three modern TV series, including Dr. House (Heel & Toe Films/Fox, 2004), Sherlock (Hartswood Films/BBC, 2010), and Elementary (Hill of Beans/CBS, 2012). Sherlock Holmes, who first appeared in 1887, was originally featured in four novels and 56 short stories. However, since that time Holmes has been adapted for over 240 movies exploiting enormous popularity of this character in a variety of settings. The paper analyzes prototypical, basic features of Sherlock Holmes underlying its intertextual adaptability. As discussed in this study, there are four prototypical features of Sherlock Holmes, i.e. (1) outstanding powers of perception combined with intellect; (2) unconventionality in social behaviour; (3) helpful partner; and (4) ability to use scientific achievements. The paper demonstrates that Sherlock Holmes conceptualized in such a basic manner can act as successfully in modern cinematic productions as it did in late 19th-century literature.
Year
Volume
2
Issue
1
Physical description
Dates
published
2014
References
Document Type
Publication order reference
Identifiers
URI
http://hdl.handle.net/11089/22710
YADDA identifier
bwmeta1.element.hdl_11089_22710
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