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2014 | 12 | 1 | 49-60
Article title

Cognitive Metaphors of the Mind in the Canterbury Tales

Content
Title variants
Languages of publication
EN
Abstracts
EN
The paper presents an analysis of a number of cognitive metaphors pertaining to the concept of mind (e.g. sanity and insanity), heart, and fire. The study has been based on the text of Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer. The paper contains a short theoretical introduction and a discussion of different linguistic and psychological approaches to issues related to figurative and literal, conventional language use. The analytical part focuses on the detailed contextual study of the cognitive metaphorical concepts. It is argued that many apparently similar concepts can evoke semantically conflicting metaphors, while concepts that appear to be mutually exclusive can sometimes evoke common associations and thereby similar metaphors.
Year
Volume
12
Issue
1
Pages
49-60
Physical description
Dates
published
2014-03-01
online
2014-06-17
Contributors
References
  • Barcelona, Antonio (2000). “On the possibility of claiming a metaphoric motivation for a conceptual metaphor” In A. Barcelona (ed.), Metaphor and metonymy at the crossroads. A cognitive perspective (31-58). Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter.
  • Bordelajo, Barbara (ed.) (2003). Caxton’s Canterbury Tales Project: The British Library Copies. Birmingham: University of Birmingham.
  • Cruse, David Alan (2004). Meaning in language. An introduction to semantics and pragmatics. Oxford: Oxford University Press.[WoS]
  • Lakoff George & Mark Johnson (1980). Metaphors we live by. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
  • Langacker, Ronald (1990). Concept, image and symbol: the cognitive basis of grammar. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter.
  • Radden, Gunter (2000). “How metonymic are metaphors.” In: A. Barcelona (ed.), Metaphor and metonymy at the cross-roads. A cognitive perspective (92-108). Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter.
  • Sweetser, Eve (1990). From etymology to pragmatics. Metaphorical and cultural aspects of semantic structure. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Szwedek, Aleksander (2007). “Alternative theory of metaphorisation. In M. Fabiszak (ed.), Language and meaning (313-327). Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang.
  • Traugott, Elisabeth (1989). “On the rise of epistemic meaning in English: an example of subjectification in semantic change.” Language, 65, 31-55.[Crossref]
Document Type
Publication order reference
Identifiers
YADDA identifier
bwmeta1.element.hdl_11089_9689
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