PL EN


2013 | 73 |
Article title

(Nad)morskie pogranicza nowoczesności. Rostock, Kłajpeda i Tallin od lat 70. XIX do lat 20. XX w.

Content
Title variants
Languages of publication
PL
Abstracts
EN
Coastal frontiers of modernity. Rostock, Memel and Tallinn from the 1870s to the 1920s. (Summary)Three various port cities of the Baltic Sea are discussed in the article: Rostock, Memel and Tallinn. These three cities were selected because of their location in the dynamic south-eastern part of the Baltic Sea region and comparing the related historical, demographic, social, economic and legal and state-related conditions, promises interesting and original results. The article discusses the fifty years between the 1870s and the first half of the 20th century. It was then that the cities had to deal with both the new political situation after the unification of Germany and the technological and globalization processes which occurred at an alarming speed, and – after World War I – the challenges posed by the emergence of new national states. The article attempts to answer the question of whether, how and why Rostock, Memel and Tallinn differed from other maritime cities, and what the sum of their social, economic and political experiences were when entering into the 20th century, in particular the interwar period. It was the interwar period that determined the nature of the cities after 1939 when the fate of all three was united – first under German, and from 1944/1945 – under Russian influence. In consequence, all three faced the transformation challenge more or less at the same time (Rostock in 1990, Memel and Tallinn in 1991). The article discusses mainly the factors that were decisive for the (non)modern nature of the said cities, their (non) compliance with the global technological and economic standards and their reactions to external models.
PL
Coastal frontiers of modernity. Rostock, Memel and Tallinn from the 1870s to the 1920s. (Summary)Three various port cities of the Baltic Sea are discussed in the article: Rostock, Memel and Tallinn. These three cities were selected because of their location in the dynamic south-eastern part of the Baltic Sea region and comparing the related historical, demographic, social, economic and legal and state-related conditions, promises interesting and original results. The article discusses the fifty years between the 1870s and the first half of the 20th century. It was then that the cities had to deal with both the new political situation after the unification of Germany and the technological and globalization processes which occurred at an alarming speed, and – after World War I – the challenges posed by the emergence of new national states. The article attempts to answer the question of whether, how and why Rostock, Memel and Tallinn differed from other maritime cities, and what the sum of their social, economic and political experiences were when entering into the 20th century, in particular the interwar period. It was the interwar period that determined the nature of the cities after 1939 when the fate of all three was united – first under German, and from 1944/1945 – under Russian influence. In consequence, all three faced the transformation challenge more or less at the same time (Rostock in 1990, Memel and Tallinn in 1991). The article discusses mainly the factors that were decisive for the (non)modern nature of the said cities, their (non) compliance with the global technological and economic standards and their reactions to external models.
Year
Volume
73
Physical description
Dates
published
2013
online
2013-01-01
Contributors
References
Document Type
Publication order reference
Identifiers
YADDA identifier
bwmeta1.element.ojs-doi-10_12775_RDSG_2013_06
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