PL EN


2012 | 10 | 19 |
Article title

Looking Throught Fragments. Aleksandar Zograf's comics diary “Regards From Serbia”

Authors
Content
Title variants
Languages of publication
PL
Abstracts
EN
n his comic Greetings from Serbia. A Journal in Comics Written During the Conflict in Serbia, Aleksander Zograf’s choice of form is associated with the periodical form of the diary in drawings kept by the author. By means of a series of episodes, Zograf shows selected fragments of daily life in Serbia: the realities of living in a country under sanctions, being bombed by NATO aircraft, and struggling with post-war chaos.A characteristic feature of the anthology Greetings from Serbia. A Journal in Comics Written During the Conflict in Serbia is – in the words of the author – “observation through fragments”. The poetics of the fragment, the autonomization of the individual elements that comprise the open composition, and the breaking up of the plot’s cohesion are all associated with the worldview that emerges from Zograf’s comics. The reality observed turns out to be chaotic, incoherent and irrational. It becomes impossible to fully embrace or provide any overarching sense to the events, and thus fictionalize and express them by means of a traditional narrative form. By choosing the form of the comic book, and abandoning a comprehensive, ordered point of view, the author attempts to describe the whole by means of fragments.
PL
In his comic Greetings from Serbia. A Journal in Comics Written During the Conflict in Serbia, Aleksander Zograf’s choice of form is associated with the periodical form of the diary in drawings kept by the author. By means of a series of episodes, Zograf shows selected fragments of daily life in Serbia: the realities of living in a country under sanctions, being bombed by NATO aircraft, and struggling with post-war chaos.A characteristic feature of the anthology Greetings from Serbia. A Journal in Comics Written During the Conflict in Serbia is – in the words of the author – “observation through fragments”. The poetics of the fragment, the autonomization of the individual elements that comprise the open composition, and the breaking up of the plot’s cohesion are all associated with the worldview that emerges from Zograf’s comics. The reality observed turns out to be chaotic, incoherent and irrational. It becomes impossible to fully embrace or provide any overarching sense to the events, and thus fictionalize and express them by means of a traditional narrative form. By choosing the form of the comic book, and abandoning a comprehensive, ordered point of view, the author attempts to describe the whole by means of fragments.
Year
Volume
10
Issue
19
Physical description
Dates
published
2012
online
2012-01-13
Contributors
author
References
Document Type
Publication order reference
Identifiers
YADDA identifier
bwmeta1.element.ojs-doi-10_14746_i_2012_19_06
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